Tag Archives: farmers

The Celebrity Farmer

Do you remember back when we used to just go to a restaurant, enjoy a meal, pay our check and head home without much thought at all to the talent back in the kitchen making it all happen? I know, it’s hard to recall such a time. There are many influences that helped bring the phenomenon of the celebrity chef to life, but suffice it to say that more often than not we now know more about the people cooking our restaurant meals than we do about our own neighbors.

Where we are now is in the early years of the newest incarnation: the celebrity farmer. Whether diners are hoping to see “Billy’s Tomatoes” on a menu (as we did recently at Sitka & Spruce, served in utter, delicious simplicity) or stand

Perfect, delicious simplicity

ready with their canvas bags, waiting for the market bell to ring the day’s opening so they can race to Rama Farm for amazing peaches or hit Whistling Train Farm before they run out of eggs. It may start with a love affair we develop for their products. But just as the separation between the front-of-the-house diners and the back-of-the-house chefs has found us yearning to get to know the people behind our meals, so has our love of certain ingredients made us want to learn more about the people on the other side of the farmers market stall. The farmers are becoming, more and more, the stars of the day. And it’s about time.

This is a phenomenon that many farmers are only slowly taking to. For my July article in Seattle Magazine, I met with and/or interviewed a number of Washington farmers who seem to begrudgingly be finding themselves in the spotlight. And drawn away from the farm. They clearly get a good dose of energy and satisfaction from interacting with shoppers at the markets, and making deliveries to restaurants, but most sounded as though they’d be just as content to be on their farms most of the times.

It’s one reason why the Incredible Feastevent around the corner (late afternoon of August 24 at Phinney Ridge Community Center) is such a treat. Sure there are top guest chefs from around the city, including John Sundstrom, Maria Hines, Holly Smith and Ethan Stowell. But it’s really the farmers who are the stars, each farm paired with a chef who will showcase the farmers products in delicious style.

On top of the great food and outstanding local products that are featured, there’s something of a carnival atmosphere at this down-home event, including games, live music and a wine and beer garden. A popular spot is always the balloon toss area. Take your chances, pop the right balloon and you may be going home with a restaurant gift certificate, a signed cookbook, outstanding local food products, you name it. Hope to see you there!!

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Cooking in Season: Sunchokes

I went to a Chef’s Collaborative event here in Seattle on Monday night. I really love the crowd at these member meet-and-greet gatherings. Can always count on seeing pals from the food and beverage world, including Charles and Rose Ann Finkel from Pike Brewing Company and Pub; Fernando and Marlene Divina from Tendrils at Cave B; Tom Buckley from Caffé Vita; Seth Caswell (president of the local chapter) from Stumbling Goat, among others. And local farmers are often the stars of the day. This week the theme was winter produce. Many farmers don’t stop growing things just because the temps drop and days get shorter. And chefs who try to devote themselves to truly local, seasonal products have a decent, if not summertime-bountiful, variety of ingredients to choose from. It just takes a little extra creativity to make the most of them.

The event was held at City Catering, chef Russell Burton dreamed up a menu featuring of-the-moment ingredients. Farmers attending that night from Full Circle Farm, Nash’s Organic and Willie Green’s Organic Farm provided arugula, beets, sunchokes, parsnips, cabbage, squash, fennel and probably one or two others things I’m forgetting. Menu items included a delicious beet and fennel terrine, roasted root vegetables, squash seed brittle, sunchoke purée, parsnip and rutabega chips, and beet cake (rather like carrot cake or zucchini bread, moist and tender).

When Andrew Stout from Full Circle addressed the group, he mentioned they’d brought the sunchokes for the chef to play around with, adding “everyone needs to come up with 5 new recipes for sunchokes!” The crowd laughed. I took it as a personal challenge. I can do this. This is what I do. But just not until this weekend’s farmers markets when can I stock up. More on those experiments later.

For now, I wanted to share you with a delicious sunchoke recipe for your reading (and hopefully eating) pleasure. It’s from my book Northwest Best Places Cookbook, Volume 2, a collection of recipes from restaurants, cafes, hotels, bakeries, etc. across Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. This sunchoke recipe came from chef David Hawksworth, then at West restaurant in Vancouver. He left that post last year, taking time now to prepared for his next big venture: Hawksworth at The Georgia. The Georgia hotel, which had its heyday in decades past, is closed for a complete renovation, due to reopen late 2009. In the meantime, he’s busy doing “research” which means eating well, cooking, traveling, taking notes, dreaming ideas….. West was always a favorite restaurant of mine in Vancouver, can’t wait to taste what David has in store for us next.

Back to sunchokes. They’re a tuber, also known as Jerusalem  artichokes. “Jerusalem” because the plant family is the same as that of the sunflower, or girasol/e in Spanish/Italian (which I guess you can imagine being corrupted to Jerusalem….). And “artichoke” because the nutty-earthy flavor is reminiscent of artichokes. Sunchokes seems to be becoming the more commonly used name lately. Flipping through my notes recently from November’s trip to France, I was reminded of this course from dinner at the 2-star Michelin La Madeleine restaurant in Sens (northern Burgundy), sunchoke cream soup–very simple–served with mini sun-dried tomato madeleines. Sublime. Oh, they’re called topinambour in France. Curious about that name? Me too. Just read something about it being a French corruption of the name of a tribe in Brasil (yes, Brasil).

Finally, here’s the promised recipe.

Sunchoke Soup with Skillet-Roasted Scallops

1 1/2 pounds sunchokes

6 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 small white onion, coarsely chopped

1 large leek, white part only, sliced

1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped

1 small carrot, coarsely chopped

1 clove garlic, crushed

1 sprig thyme

1 bay leaf

4 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade

1 cup milk

1/2 cup whipping cream

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice, more to taste

salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 teaspoons olive oil

12 sea scallops

4 sprigs chervil or flat-leaf parsley

Use the edge of a spoon or a vegetable peeler to scrape away the thin skin from the sunchokes, dropping them into a bowl of water as you finish to help minimize discoloration. When all the sunchokes have been peeled, drain them well and coarsely chop them.

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the sunchokes, onion, leek, celery, carrot, garlic, thyme and bay leaf. Cook, stirring often, until the vegetables begin to soften, 8 to 10 minutes (the vegetables shouldn’t brown; reduce the heat if needed). Add the chicken stock, milk and cream, bring the liquid just to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the vegetables are very tender, 30 to 40 minutes.

Remove and discard the thyme sprig and bay leaf from the soup, then purée the soup in batches in a blender or food processor and return it to the pan. Season the soup to taste with lemon juice, salt and pepper and keep warm over low heat.

In a large skillet (preferably nonstick) heat the olive oil over medium-high heat until it just begins to smoke. Add the scallops and cook until nicely browned, 1 to 2 minutes on each side (the scallops will remain translucent in the center).

To serve, arrange the scallops in the bottom of individual shallow soup bowls and ladle the hot soup around them. Garnish each serving with a sprig of chervil in the center and serve right away.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

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